Does God Appreciate Good Advice?

(Sneak peek: Chatter editor letter for July) My son believes he is God’s gift to me in the kitchen. He pours the cheese powder for macaroni. He stirs the ground beef for spaghetti sauce. He carries his plate to the table. These tasks are his birthright. Before he came into the world, these tasks were never completed. No one ever ate macaroni or enjoyed spaghetti. It just never happened. Until September 19, 2007, and then the world of boxed food possibilities opened up for humanity like a loaded vault.

Drew doesn’t just like to help me. He MUST help me. Except when Caillou is on TV and then whatever may or may not become of dinner is for the ages to decide. Drew has made his peace with it; he has surrendered to the epic sovereignty of God and what little ability his mother might have to fix a version of supper.

Do I resent this? Do I feel underestimated and slighted? Naw. I just chuckle. It’s adorable. Kid can’t even write his name and he has ideas about colanders. That’s a riot. The question of it hurting my feelings is empty because that category doesn’t even apply.

My friend Gene was once talking about how he sometimes gets nervous when his mom visits IBC. She is Korean and grew up Catholic, and he really wants her to feel comfortable at our church and hopes God will powerfully speak to her and minister in ways Gene isn’t capable of. I can relate to that. I get nervous on God’s behalf. Gene told me half-jokingly he prays that the guest speaker on the Sunday his mother visits will be a Korean woman with a Catholic background. You know, to give God a leg-up in case he was looking for suggestions.

I’ve done that too. I’ve given God suggestions. I just want to make it sort of a no-brainer for him, like when you e-mail your Christmas list to your mom so she can click over to Amazon with minimal effort. Wouldn’t God appreciate an Amazon gift list? A Dummy’s Guide? A few pointers? I’m just trying to be helpful. Doesn’t it honor God to be proactive?

I don’t mean to make light of the ways we struggle to trust God, but the truth is that resting in the competency of God is harder than we imagine. It’s like putting weight on a foot that has completely fallen asleep. You don’t want to look ridiculous hopping out of the dark theater, so you hold your breath, cross your fingers, and…step. Then step again. Pins and needles. A little burning. A sensation in your big toe, then in other toes, and now you’re walking more steadily, and hey! All indications are that your date still finds you mildly attractive. WIN.

If I were God (and that’s a scary way to begin a sentence), and everybody was sending up suggestions to me like a bunch of three-year-olds, I might be tempted to call down a light misting of brimstone. Nothing apocalyptic, just something for a little peace and quiet, a little more respect please, a little more reverence for the scope and promises of Scripture, for the love of Me.

But after becoming a mother, I’ve got a hunch that all our ideas and solutions are sort of precious to our loving, compassionate Creator. I mean, he may not take all our advice. But I bet he’s glad to have us in the kitchen.

Julie

9 Comments to “Does God Appreciate Good Advice?”
  1. Laura says:

    I always get so much out of your posts, Julie. some good laughs, some good reflection, some thought-provoking/growth inducing moments…more gratefulness for the roles I get to play, and for the God who loves me (even in spite of me)…but today’s blog was a chilling, wonderful shot through the heart, where I really felt God speaking to me through you. Thank you for you, and for letting God use you in such powerful ways.

  2. I’d be happy for you to be God, at least for a day! love, DAD

  3. Amy says:

    I love this. So true, so true. Good perspective reminder.

  4. Alice says:

    What a great analogy! I must be a spiritual 3 year old – just can’t help telling God what to do and how to do it! I’m just sure he needs my help. :) I love your perspective. And you. :)

  5. Julie says:

    Are you saying that your friend’s mom needs God to fix her because she is Catholic or just help her feel comfortable enough to attend church with her son?

Post a Comment

Spam protection by WP Captcha-Free